US sees heightened extremist threat heading into midterms

A looming Supreme Court ruling on abortion, a surge in the number of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border and midterm elections are potential triggers for extremist violence in the next six months, the Department said Tuesday. internal security. Supreme Court on Roe v. Wade’s United States was already in a “heightened threat environment,” and these factors could make the situation worse, the DHS said in the National Terrorism Advisory System’s latest bulletin. “In the coming months, we expect the threat environment to become more dynamic as multiple high-profile events could be exploited to justify acts of violence against a range of possible targets,” the DHS said on the international terrorism that characterized the agency after its creation after the attacks of September 11, 2001. Indeed, threats from abroad are only passing men in this bulletin. celebrated the January clash at a synagogue in Colleyville, Texas, and says the Islamic State group has called on its supporters to carry out attacks in the United States in revenge for the killing of the group’s leader and spokesperson. also warns that China, Russia, Iran and other countries seek to foment divisions within the United States weaken the country and its position in the world.In part, they do so by amplifying conspiracy theories and the false reports that proliferate in American society. Domestic violent extremists, however, pose the most pressing and potentially violent threat, the agency said, citing, for example, the racist attack in which a white gunman killed 10 black people at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, in May. A senior DHS official, speaking to reporters ahead of the bulletin’s release, said he described the situation as “dynamic” because authorities are seeing a greater variety of people motivated by a wider range of grievances and challenges. incidents than in the past. The upcoming Supreme Court decision, which could overturn Roe v. Wade, could lead to violence from extremist supporters or opponents of abortion rights depending on t The outcome, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss some factors that went into the preparation of the newsletter. has been used since the start of the coronavirus pandemic to prevent people from seeking asylum at the Southwest border, DHS said. The agency and FBI are working with state and local law enforcement to raise awareness of the threat, and DHS has increased grant funding to local governments and religious organizations to improve security, the Secretary of State said. Homeland Security, Alejandro N. Mayorkas, in a statement released with the bulletin.

A looming Supreme Court ruling on abortion, a surge in migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border and midterm elections are potential triggers for extremist violence in the next six months, the Department of Health said Tuesday. Homeland security.

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The United States was already in a “heightened threat environment,” and these factors could worsen the situation, the DHS said in the latest bulletin from the National Terrorism Advisory System.

“In the coming months, we expect the threat environment to become more dynamic as multiple high-profile events could be leveraged to justify acts of violence against a range of possible targets,” DHS said.

It’s Homeland Security’s latest attempt to draw attention to the threat posed by domestic violent extremism, a shift from the international terrorism alerts that were a feature of the agency after it was created after the attacks of September 11, 2001.

Indeed, threats from abroad are only mentioned in passing in this bulletin. He notes that al-Qaeda supporters celebrated the January clash at a synagogue in Colleyville, Texas. And he mentions that the Islamic State group has called on its supporters to carry out attacks in the United States to avenge the murder of the group’s leader and spokesman.

DHS also warns that China, Russia, Iran and other countries seek to foment divisions within the United States to weaken the country and its standing in the world. In part, they do this by amplifying the conspiracy theories and false reports that proliferate in American society.

Domestic violent extremists, however, pose the most pressing and potentially violent threat, the agency said, citing, for example, the racist attack in which a white gunman killed 10 black people at a Buffalo supermarket, New York, in May.

The bulletin, which is due to expire Nov. 30, said calls for violence by domestic extremists directed against democratic institutions, candidates and election workers are likely to increase throughout the fall.

A senior DHS official, speaking to reporters ahead of the bulletin’s release, said he described the situation as “dynamic” because authorities are seeing a greater variety of people motivated by a wider range of grievances and challenges. incidents than in the past.

The upcoming Supreme Court decision, which could overturn Roe v. Wade, could lead to violence from extremist supporters or abortion rights opponents depending on the outcome, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss some factors. in the preparation of the newsletter.

Racial extremists may be motivated by immigration enforcement or if the government continues to rely on Title 42, the public health order that has been used since the start of the coronavirus pandemic to prevent people seeking asylum at the southwest border, DHS said.

The agency and FBI are working with state and local law enforcement to raise awareness of the threat, and DHS has increased grant funding to local governments and religious organizations to improve security, the Secretary of State said. Homeland Security, Alejandro N. Mayorkas, in a statement released with the bulletin.

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