Laboratory medicine – Vet Clin Path Journal http://vetclinpathjournal.org/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 11:03:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Laboratory medicine – Vet Clin Path Journal http://vetclinpathjournal.org/ 32 32 Global Clinical Trial Kits Market (2021-2028) https://vetclinpathjournal.org/global-clinical-trial-kits-market-2021-2028/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/global-clinical-trial-kits-market-2021-2028/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 08:33:00 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/global-clinical-trial-kits-market-2021-2028/

Dublin, October 08, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The Clinical Trial Kits Market Size, Share and Trend Analysis Report by Department (Kit Solutions, Logistics), by Phase (Phase I, Phase II, Phase III, Phase IV), by Region and segment forecast, 2021-2028 “ report was added to ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The global clinical trial kits market size is expected to reach $ 2.5 billion by 2028, according to a new report from the publisher. The market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 8.5% from 2021 to 2028. Factors driving the market expansion include globalization of clinical trials, increasing demand for remote services, and increasing complexity of trials. clinics.

Remote clinical trial services are becoming increasingly essential in terms of patient retention, satisfaction and safety. To enhance their capabilities, pharmaceutical companies have established a relationship with global logistics partners to provide direct services to patients. These services provide participants with the flexibility and convenience of participating in trials while staying at home.

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the market, which has slowed down the testing process. The COVID-19 pandemic is rapidly spurring advancements in medical practices that allow people to remotely connect to the healthcare system. This effort to examine patients at home has sparked interest in home sample collection and testing. These services are convenient and minimize the potential exposure to SARS-CoV-2.

Companies have started offering digital direct testing services to consumers. Other aspects of the testing process, from ordering tests to collecting samples, are already making their way into patient homes. In addition, regulatory authorities instantly gave sponsors directions to address issues that arose during ongoing clinical studies. Changes such as the use of telemedicine, the elimination of non-essential laboratory visits and assessments, as well as diagnostic testing and sample collection, have allowed many studies to continue while ensuring the patient safety during the pandemic.

Highlights of the Clinical Trial Kits Market Report

  • The logistics segment dominated the market and accounted for the largest revenue share of 54.9% in 2020. This is due to the increasing demand for services to simplify the logistics process in clinical trials.

  • Phase III segment dominated the market and accounted for the largest revenue share of 53.4% ​​in 2020 as phase III trials require large numbers of participants

  • North America dominated the market in 2020 due to favorable government support and the existence of a large number of companies offering innovative services in the United States.

  • In Asia-Pacific, the market is expected to experience the highest CAGR of 9.9% during the forecast period as the region keeps growing in terms of clinical trials due to the large population and technology. in development.

Main topics covered:

Chapter 1 Methodology and Scope

Chapter 2 Executive Summary

Chapter 3 Clinical Trial Kits Market: Variables, Trends and Scope
3.1 Market Lineage Outlook
3.1.1 Parents’ Market Outlook
3.1.2 Auxiliary Market Outlook
3.2 Mapping of penetration and growth prospects
3.3 Market dynamics
3.3.1 Market Driver Analysis
3.3.1.1 Globalization of clinical trials
3.3.1.2 Growing demand for remote services
3.3.1.3 Growing complexity of clinical trials
3.3.2 Analysis of market restrictions
3.3.2.1 Different regulations depending on the country
3.4 Analysis Tools of the Clinical Trial Kits Market
3.4.1 Porter’s five forces analysis
3.4.2 PESTEL analysis
3.4.3 Major transactions and strategic alliances
3.4.3.1 Acquisition
3.4.3.2 Partnerships
3.4.3.3 Enlargement
3.4.3.4 Product launch
3.4.3.5 Collaboration
3.5 Clinical Trial Kits Market: Total Addressable Market (TAM) Analysis
3.5.1 Market Overview

Chapter 4 Impact of Covid-19
4.1 Impact of COVID-19 on the market
4.2 Impact of COVID-19 on logistics
4.3 Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical trial activity
4.3.1 Barriers to Clinical Trials
4.3.2 Discontinued clinical trials
4.3.2.1 Companies with Phase I trial interruption
4.3.2.2 Companies with Phase 2 trial interruption
4.3.2.3 Companies with Phase 3 trial interruption

Chapter 5 Clinical Trial Kits Market: Service Segment Analysis
5.1 Clinical trial kits: market share analysis, 2020 and 2028
5.2 Assembly solutions
5.2.1 Kitting Solutions Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)
5.2.2 Drug kits
5.2.2.1 Drug Kits Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)
5.2.3 Sample collection kits
5.2.3.1 Sample Collection Kits Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)
5.3 Logistics
5.3.1 Logistics Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)
5.3.2 Transport
5.3.2.1 Transportation Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)
5.3.3 Warehousing and storage
5.3.3.1 Warehousing and Storage Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)
5.3.4 Others
5.3.4.1 Other markets, 2016 – 2028 (USD million)

Chapter 6 Clinical Trial Kits Market: Phase Segment Analysis
6.1 Clinical Trial Kits: Market Share Analysis, 2020 and 2028
6.2 Phase I
6.2.1 Phase I Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)
6.3 Phase II
6.3.1 Phase II Market, 2016 – 2028 (USD Million)
6.4 Phase III
6.4.1 Phase III Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)
6.5 Phase IV
6.5.1 Phase IV Market, 2016-2028 (USD Million)

Chapter 7 Clinical Trial Kits Market: Regional Analysis

Chapter 8 Competitive Landscape
8.1 Company profiles
8.1.1 Brooks Life Sciences
8.1.1.1 Company overview
8.1.1.2 Financial performance
8.1.1.3 Benchmarking of services
8.1.1.4 Strategic initiatives
8.1.2 Q2 solutions
8.1.2.1 Company overview
8.1.2.2 Financial performance
8.1.2.3 Benchmarking of services
8.1.2.4 Strategic initiatives
8.1.3 Patheon (Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc)
8.1.3.1 Company overview
8.1.3.2 Financial performance
8.1.3.3 ServicebBenchmarking
8.1.4 Labcorp Drug Development
8.1.4.1 Company overview
8.1.4.2 financial performance
8.1.4.3 Benchmarking of services
8.1.4.4 Strategic initiatives
8.1.5 Charles River Laboratories
8.1.5.1 Company overview
8.1.5.2 Financial performance
8.1.5.3 Benchmarking of services
8.1.6 LAbConnect
8.1.6.1 Company overview
8.1.6.2 Benchmarking of services
8.1.6.3 Strategic initiatives
8.1.7 Almac Group
8.1.7.1 Company overview
8.1.7.2 Benchmarking of services
8.1.7.3 Strategic initiatives
8.1.8 Precision Medicine Group
8.1.8.1 Company overview
8.1.8.2 Benchmarking of services
8.1.8.3 Strategic initiatives
8.1.9 Cerba search
8.1.9.1 Company overview
8.1.9.2 Benchmarking of services
8.1.10 Alpha Laboratories
8.1.10.1 Company overview
8.1.10.2 Benchmarking of services
8.1.11 Marking a UPS Company
8.1.11.1 Company overview
8.1.11.2 Benchmarking of services
8.1.11.3 Strategic initiatives
8.1.12 Clinogen
8.1.12.1 Company overview
8.1.12.2 Financial performance
8.1.12.3 Benchmarking of services
8.1.12.4 Strategic initiatives

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/lbz1ty

CONTACT: CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
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Top tech news from AACC 2021 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/top-tech-news-from-aacc-2021/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/top-tech-news-from-aacc-2021/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 11:11:49 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/top-tech-news-from-aacc-2021/

We’ve rounded up the latest clinical news and technological advancements that have made waves at this year’s conference

The American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) 2021 Annual Scientific Meeting and Clinical Laboratory Expo was held September 26-30 in Atlanta, Georgia. This year’s conference was held in person and was also available virtually for those who were unable to travel due to the pandemic.

The event had over 400 exhibitors, with over 50 expert speakers and a product showcase showcasing the latest diagnostic technologies, SARS-CoV-2 testing, mHealth, automation and point-of-service solutions. Speakers at the event covered topics related to emerging technologies in laboratory medicine, the burden of infectious diseases, microsystems engineering, emergency medicine and much more.

This year’s conference attendees were also invited to participate in the COVID-19 Immunity Study, launched by the AACC. The study aims to study the longevity of the vaccine and to examine the use of serological tests to measure lasting immunity in a large cohort.

In this news summary, discover the best technologies and research on the news shared at the show, click on the headlines to find out more.

The AACC 2022 Annual Scientific Meeting and Clinical Laboratory Exhibition will be held in Chicago from July 24-28, 2022.

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Tiny bubbles promise to reduce inflammation https://vetclinpathjournal.org/tiny-bubbles-promise-to-reduce-inflammation/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/tiny-bubbles-promise-to-reduce-inflammation/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 02:43:00 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/tiny-bubbles-promise-to-reduce-inflammation/

Scientists are hoping that tiny bags of material excreted by cells – known as extracellular vesicles – can be used to deliver drugs inside the body. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet are now showing that these nanobubbles can carry protein drugs that reduce inflammation caused by different diseases. The technique, which is presented in Nature Biomedical Engineering, shows promising results in animal models.

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important in intercellular communication as vectors of biological signals. These are nanoscale membrane-covered packages excreted by cells that can deliver fatty acids, proteins, and genetic material to different tissues.

The tiny bubbles are found naturally in body fluids, are able to cross biological barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier, and can be used as natural carriers of therapeutic substances. Therefore, electric vehicles have gained increasing interest as potential drugs.

Using biomolecular techniques, researchers at Karolinska Institutet coated the outer membrane of the EV with therapeutic proteins, specifically receptors that bind to inflammatory substances TNF-α and interleukin 6 (IL 6).

TNF-α and IL 6 are formed in the body under inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and play a key role in inflammation and resulting tissue damage. This knowledge has led to the development of biological drugs that attenuate the inflammatory response by inhibiting TNF-α and IL 6.

In the present study, the researchers attempted to inhibit inflammatory substances using therapeutic electric vehicles that express receptors on their membranes that bind to IL 6 and TNF-α.

We used different methods to optimize receptor expression and tested different variants of EVs in inflammatory cell models to identify which strategy gave the greatest anti-inflammatory effect. “

Dhanu Gupta, PhD student, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet

Dhanu Gupta is the first joint author of the study with his colleague in the department Oscar Wiklander.

The researchers then examined the effects of therapeutic electric vehicles in three inflammatory animal models relevant to sepsis (blood poisoning), MS and IBD.

In the animal model of sepsis, treatment significantly improved survival, suggesting successful damping of the inflammatory response.

In the MS model, researchers also found a significant reduction in the neurological symptoms seen during MS flares. Treatment with electric vehicles expressing both receptors also showed a significant increase in survival in mouse models of IBD.

“Our results are an important step in the right direction and demonstrate that electric vehicles can be a promising treatment for inflammation, but the technique also has great potential for many other diseases,” says Samir EL Andaloussi, principal investigator at Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and co-last author of the study with Joel Nordin from the same department.

Source:

Journal reference:

Gupta, D., et al. (2021) Improvement of systemic inflammation via the display of two different decoy protein receptors on extracellular vesicles. Nature Biomedical Engineering. doi.org/10.1038/s41551-021-00792-z.

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Tiny bubbles may be a future treatment for inflammation https://vetclinpathjournal.org/tiny-bubbles-may-be-a-future-treatment-for-inflammation/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/tiny-bubbles-may-be-a-future-treatment-for-inflammation/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 15:02:00 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/tiny-bubbles-may-be-a-future-treatment-for-inflammation/

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important in intercellular communication as vectors of biological signals. These are nanoscale membrane-covered packages excreted by cells that can deliver fatty acids, proteins, and genetic material to different tissues.

The tiny bubbles are found naturally in body fluids, are able to cross biological barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier, and can be used as natural carriers of therapeutic substances. Therefore, electric vehicles have gained increasing interest as potential drugs.

MS and IBD

Using biomolecular techniques, researchers at Karolinska Institutet coated the outer membrane of the EV with therapeutic proteins, specifically receptors that bind to inflammatory substances TNF-α and interleukin 6 (IL 6).

TNF-α and IL 6 are formed in the body under inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and play a key role in inflammation and resulting tissue damage. This knowledge has led to the development of biological drugs that attenuate the inflammatory response by inhibiting TNF-α and IL 6.

Greater anti-inflammatory effect

In the present study, the researchers attempted to inhibit inflammatory substances using therapeutic electric vehicles that express receptors on their membranes that bind to IL 6 and TNF-α.

“We used different methods to optimize receptor expression and tested different variants of EVs in inflammatory cell models to identify which strategy gave the greatest anti-inflammatory effect,” explains Dhanu gupta, doctoral student at the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, co-first author of the study with a colleague from the department Oscar Wiklander.

The researchers then examined the effects of therapeutic electric vehicles in three inflammatory animal models relevant to sepsis (blood poisoning), MS and IBD.

Reduction of neurological symptoms

In the animal model of sepsis, treatment significantly improved survival, suggesting successful damping of the inflammatory response.

In the MS model, researchers also found a significant reduction in the neurological symptoms seen during MS flares. Treatment with electric vehicles expressing both receptors also showed a significant increase in survival in mouse models of IBD.

“Our results are an important step in the right direction and demonstrate that electric vehicles may be a promising treatment for inflammation, but the technique also has great potential for many other diseases,” says Samir EL Andaloussi, principal investigator at the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and co-last author of the study with Joel Nordin from the same department.

The study was funded by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research and the Research Council. Matthew Wood, Samir EL Andaloussi, Dhanu Gupta, André Görgens, Joel Nordin, Oscar Wiklander, Per Lundin, Antonin de Fougerolles and Justin Hean have various commitments with Evox Therapeutics. There are no other conflicts of interest reported.

Publication

“Improvement of systemic inflammation through the display of two different decoy protein receptors on extracellular vesicles“, Dhanu Gupta, Oscar PB Wiklander, André Görgens, Mariana Conceição, Giulia Corso, Xiuming Liang, YiqiSeow, SriramBalusu, Ulrika Feldin, BeklemBostancioglu, Rim Jawad, Doste R Mamand, Yi Xin Fionana Roberts, Lee, Justin Heger Manuel Gustafsson, Dara K Mohammad, Helena Sork, Alexandra Backlund, Per Lundin, Antonin de Fougerolles, CI Edvard Smith, Matthew JA Wood, Roosmarijn E. Vandenbroucke, Joel Z. Nordin, Samir EL Andaloussi. Nature Biomedical Engineering, online October 6 2021, doi: 10.1038 / s41551-021-00792-z.

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Osteoporosis drug may be a promising treatment https://vetclinpathjournal.org/osteoporosis-drug-may-be-a-promising-treatment/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/osteoporosis-drug-may-be-a-promising-treatment/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 02:03:31 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/osteoporosis-drug-may-be-a-promising-treatment/

Clinical trials are underway after scientists using the advanced photon source discovered that lasofoxifene may be a safer and more effective treatment for breast cancer than the current gold standard.

In 2020, 2.3 million women worldwide were diagnosed with breast cancer, according to the World Health Organization, and the disease caused 685,000 deaths. Treatments can be very effective, but healthcare professionals are constantly looking for more effective ways to slow the growth and spread of breast cancer tumors.

A team of scientists from the University of Chicago have found that lasofoxifene, a drug used to treat osteoporosis, may be one of these most effective treatments. In a study published in Breast Cancer Research, the team found that lasofoxifene outperformed fulvestrant, the current benchmark drug, in reducing or preventing primary tumor growth of breast cancer in mice.

The drug was also more effective at preventing metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones and brain – the four most common areas where breast cancer spreads. Additionally, while fulvestrant and similar drugs often cause unwanted side effects similar to menopause, lasofoxifen did not produce some of these symptoms in mice.

“People should be very excited about this,” said Geoffrey Greene, chair of the Ben May cancer research department at the University of Chicago and lead author of the article. “Besides being more effective, this medicine is better able to treat the whole person, including bone density and certain other symptoms, such as vaginal atrophy.”

The research team used the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) science facility at DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory, to confirm that lasofoxifen binds to estrogen receptor molecules. About 75% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive or ER positive. This means that cancer cells have receptors that respond to the hormone estrogen and use it to nourish the tumor and make it grow.

APS uses ultra-bright x-rays to illuminate structures of proteins like estrogen receptors, often looking to see if drug compounds attach to these proteins. The structures were determined at the Center for Structural Biology (SBC) and the beamlines of the Southeast Regional Collaborative Access Team.

“We have provided facilities to help determine the structures of the drug with estrogen receptors,” said Andrzej Joachimiak, director of SBC Argonne and the University of Chicago. “It is rare to find such a promising drug compound to become a treatment. This is potentially a very important finding.

Although effective, drugs like fulvestrant can cause side effects similar to menopause, including loss of bone density, hot flashes, and vaginal atrophy.

“You get these unwanted side effects that really make people miserable,” Greene said.

Previous observational studies of lasofoxifene had shown that in addition to preventing bone loss, it was also effective in preventing breast cancer, reducing the incidence of ER-positive breast cancer by approximately 80%, compared to other drugs.

“It has a good safety profile, maintains bone density, prevents vaginal dryness, and does not increase the risk of uterine cancer,” Greene said.

But while it was clear that lasofoxifen could help prevent breast cancer, it was not yet clear whether it had anti-tumor properties as well.

Researchers at the University of Chicago worked with mice with ER-positive breast cancer tumors with activating ER mutations. They treated some of the mice with lasofoxifene and others with fulvestrant. They also tested the two drugs in combination with palbociclib, a common chemotherapy drug that works by preventing cancer cells from multiplying.

They found that lasofoxifene was more effective than fulvestrant in preventing tumor growth and reducing metastasis when used alone. The addition of palbociclib improved the effectiveness of both drugs, but again the lasofoxifene / palbociclib combination was more effective.

“This study demonstrated that lasofoxifene appears to be superior, both alone and in combination, compared to fulvestrant,” Greene said.

Besides having fewer side effects, lasofoxifene offers several other notable benefits. Unlike fulvestrant, which is injected, lasofoxifene can be taken orally. It also has a long half-life, which means that it persists in the body for a long time.

“What you want is that every time a new estrogen receptor is synthesized, especially if it has a mutation, there is a drug to block it,” Greene explained. “One of the advantages of lasofoxifene is that it is more likely to be there to do its job.”

A phase 2 clinical trial is now underway at the University of Chicago Medicine to study lasofoxifene as a second-line treatment in postmenopausal women with ER-positive metastatic breast cancers who have ER mutations. A separate clinical trial, which is currently recruiting patients, will study lasofoxifene in combination with abemaciclib, a chemotherapy drug similar to palbociclib.

“Most women with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer right now are treated with fulvestrant, and based on our study, I don’t think it’s the best drug for this purpose,” said Muriel Laine, research associate in the Ben May department and lead author of the study. “Lasofoxifene definitely seems to have more promise for these women.”

###

A version of this version was originally released by Chicago Medical University.

The study was supported by Sermonix Pharmaceuticals and the US Department of Energy, Bureau of Biological and Environmental Research (DE-AC02-06CH11357). Additional authors include Ya-Fang Chang, Bradley Green, Marianne E. Greene, Justyna D. Kurleto, and Linda Phung of UChicago; Sean W. Fanning of Loyola University in Chicago; and Barry Comm from Komm-Sandin Pharma Consulting.


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Biorprinting of human tissues for drug testing https://vetclinpathjournal.org/biorprinting-of-human-tissues-for-drug-testing/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/biorprinting-of-human-tissues-for-drug-testing/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 13:14:00 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/biorprinting-of-human-tissues-for-drug-testing/

Bio-printers that allow scientists to design complex tissues and organs. It sounds like science fiction, but not to scientists at the Alireza Mashaghi lab at the Leiden Academic Center for Drug Research. The laboratory was recently equipped with two state-of-the-art bio-printers: BioX and LumenX +. 3D and 4D bio-printed fabrics are expected to revolutionize the biomedical field by eliminating the need for laboratory animals and enabling high-tech innovations such as next-generation organ chips.

Bioprinting has received a lot of attention because of its ability to recapitulate native human tissue. “The two Leiden bio-printers both have their own qualities,” explains Mashaghi. BioX is capable of printing at multiple nozzles, which allows printing of multilayer structures with distinct cellular components. The light-based LumenX + printer is exceptionally accurate. “Printers can also be combined with each other and with other complementary approaches to design even more sophisticated fabrics. “

Printed fabrics can replace animal experiments

“With our expertise, we can help make animal testing redundant. “

According to Mashaghi, there is growing interest in developing alternatives to the use of animals in research. Mashaghi: “Animal models are still the norm in preclinical studies. But the high drug failure rates in these clinical trials suggest that the differences between animals and humans are too great. Laboratory animals are therefore neither reliable models of human disease nor good predictors of drug efficacy and toxicity. ‘ The ethical issues associated with animal testing are also of great concern. Mashaghi: “Bio-printed fabrics could offer a solution. We hope to contribute to this revolution in our field.

Fight viral diseases

The mission of the Mashaghi laboratory is to bridge the gap between medicine, physical sciences and engineering. In this way, the group hopes to develop new approaches to combat the diseases that impose a significant burden on our society. The laboratory has been at the forefront of developing technical models for viral diseases, including Ebola, Lassa and Covid-19. 3D and 4D bioprinting technologies will enable the LACDR group to create the next generation of disease models for viral diseases and beyond.

Open to collaborations

This type of interdisciplinary research often requires collaborations between several research laboratories. Mashaghi: “We anticipate that the unique technology available in our lab will be of interest to our colleagues at Leiden Bio Science Park, Leiden University Medical Center and other centers across the country. We are open to collaborations and hope to broaden the scope of applications of viral diseases to other infectious, inflammatory and cancerous diseases. ‘

Further reading

Huaqi Tang, Yasmine Abouleila, Longlong Si, Ana Maria Ortega-Prieto, Christine L Mummery, Donald E Ingber, Alireza Mashaghi, Human Organs on Chip for Virology. Trends in Microbiology 28 (11): 934-946 (2020)

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization / authors and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author (s). here.

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Jackson Laboratory announces change of management https://vetclinpathjournal.org/jackson-laboratory-announces-change-of-management/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/jackson-laboratory-announces-change-of-management/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 18:54:36 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/jackson-laboratory-announces-change-of-management/

The Jackson Laboratory, a Bar Harbor-based nonprofit biomedical research institution, has appointed a new president and CEO and said its current head is resigning from his post – but not leaving the organization.

Lon Cardon, new president and CEO of the Jackson Laboratory Photo courtesy of the Jackson Laboratory

Jackson Lab said in a press release Monday that Lon Cardon, a pioneer in human genetics and drug discovery, would succeed current leader Dr Edison Liu in late November. However, he said Liu will continue his research in the laboratory studying functional cancer genomics with a focus on breast cancer.

Jackson Lab breeds specialized mice for scientific research and is engaged in a variety of research projects related to cancer, tissue regeneration, and other cutting-edge areas of biology and medicine.

“After ten years of leading (the lab) through impressive expansion, dramatic changes and remarkable achievements, Ed (Liu) has made an indelible impact… as a leader, researcher and oncologist in our local communities and in the field. worldwide in biomedical research, ”said David Roux, chairman of the laboratory’s board of directors. “We are now delighted to appoint Lon as the next President and CEO… Under his leadership, Lon will guide the lab through its next period of intense growth. “

Cardon joined California-based pharmaceutical company BioMarin Pharmaceutical in 2017 as Scientific Director and Senior Vice President and was promoted in 2019 to Director of Scientific Strategy.

Prior to joining BioMarin, he was senior vice president of UK pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, leading departments and divisions spanning genetics, molecular biology, computational biology, statistics and epidemiology.

Prior to Cardon’s 14-year career in the pharmaceutical industry, he spent the first half of his career as a senior scholar in the UK and US, first as a professor of bioinformatics at the ‘University of Oxford, then as Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Washington and Co-Chair of the Herbold Bioinformatics Program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Cardon received his doctorate from the University of Colorado and conducted his postdoctoral research in the Department of Mathematics at Stanford University. He has received a Principal Fellowship from the Wellcome Trust and is an elected member of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Cardon is the author of more than 225 scientific publications and 15 books and chapters, primarily focused on genetic methodology, applications and findings for rare and common diseases, ranging from Huntington’s disease to dyslexia, according to Jackson Lab. .

“For many years, there has been an immense promise to translate the discoveries of human genetics and genomics into new diagnoses, prognoses and treatments for common and rare diseases,” Cardon said in the release. “A lot of the fundamentals are finally in place. The next step is to put them together to start fulfilling that promise. “


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Northwestern’s SPORE has made progress in understanding the genetic basis of glioblastoma https://vetclinpathjournal.org/northwesterns-spore-has-made-progress-in-understanding-the-genetic-basis-of-glioblastoma/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/northwesterns-spore-has-made-progress-in-understanding-the-genetic-basis-of-glioblastoma/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 18:08:00 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/northwesterns-spore-has-made-progress-in-understanding-the-genetic-basis-of-glioblastoma/

Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest cancers known to man. While the advent of immunotherapy and other cutting-edge treatments have extended the lives of people with other types of cancer, the prognosis for glioblastoma has remained relatively constant – just 18 months.

This year and a half can be brutal: bombarding the brain with radiation in an attempt to crush the cancer until it submits, often with little success. Glioblastoma is notoriously resistant to treatment, adapting quickly and reappearing with fatal results.

SPORE is led by Matt Lesniak, MD, President of Neurological Surgery and Michael J. Marchese Professor of Neurosurgery, and C. David James, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Neurological Surgery.

It is no exaggeration to say that almost all patients with glioblastoma will unfortunately succumb to cancer. It is, in almost all cases, incurable. “

C. David James, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Neurological Surgery

The lethality of glioblastoma and the scarcity of effective treatments are what prompted Maciej Lesniak, MD, president and Michael J. Marchese professor of neurosurgery, as well as James, to apply for the Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) at the ‘National Cancer Institute. , which will be awarded to the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer at Northwestern University. They didn’t do it alone: ​​the arrival in 2017 of renowned neuro-oncologist Roger Stupp, MD, professor of neurological surgery Paul C. Bucy and head of neuro-oncology in the department of neurology, strengthened expertise in glioblastoma. at Northwestern, and his continued leadership has been a tremendous boon to the program, said Lesniak.

Northwestern’s Brain Tumor SPORE – part of the Lurie Cancer Center – is now three years old, and the bench-to-bedside process is producing results. Under the leadership of Lesniak and James, SPORE has made progress in understanding the genetic basis of the disease and has developed potential therapies that reduce resistance to treatment and clinical trials using immunotherapies. The SPORE philosophy of collaboration and team science under one roof is alive and well.

Genetics of glioblastoma

Since the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) published its 2008 landmark analysis of the genetics of glioblastoma, scientists such as Alexander Stegh, PhD, Associate Professor in the Ken Department of Neurology and Ruth Davee, Division of Neuro-Oncology, have used this roadmap to guide their research.

“The TCGA gave us this ‘periodic table’ of genes deregulated in glioblastoma,” said Stegh, who is also an associate professor of medicine in the division of hematology and oncology.

Alexander Stegh, PhD, Associate Professor in the Ken and Ruth Davee Department of Neurology, Neuro-Oncology Division, focuses on the genetic deregulation that contributes to therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma.

While some cancers have relatively easy to distinguish oncogen activations, it is increasingly understood that glioblastoma is caused by variants of many genes. This is why previous attempts at therapies targeting single genes have failed, such as those targeting alterations in the brain. EGFR gene, and why Stegh focuses on the genetic deregulation that contributes to resistance to therapy.

“Rather than going out there with the very ambitious goal of identifying multiple genes and lowering their levels of expression, we take a slightly different approach: how do we specifically down-regulate the genes that cause a resistance to therapy, as an adjuvant therapeutic approach, ”Stegh said.

Stegh has published several papers identifying important genes involved in resistance to glioblastoma treatment, but one gene, called Bcl2L12, has proven to be particularly suitable for therapeutic administration.

Combining his genetic expertise with the nanotechnology expertise of Chad Mirkin, PhD, professor of medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology; and the clinical trial expertise of Priya Kumthekar, MD, ’08 ’11 ’12 GME, associate professor of neurology in the division of neuro-oncology, the researchers designed a spherical nucleic acid drug that passed through the blood brain barrier and primed tumor cells for death.

The trial, published in Scientific translational medicine, was the first of its kind to show that nanotherapeutics crossed the blood-brain barrier and entered brain tumor cells in patients.

“This unique 3D design has the ability to infiltrate tumor cells to correct the genes within and make them susceptible to therapy-induced destruction,” Stegh said.

Bcl2L12 was initially identified as a treatment target by Stegh in 2007. “Going from identifying this gene during my postdoctoral work to targeting it and establishing proof of concept in patients is very rewarding. ”Stegh said. “We look forward to building on this success. “

Drill

A recurring barrier in the treatment of glioblastoma is the blood brain barrier. Efforts to develop treatments beyond simple chemotherapy are often hampered by the selective permeability of the barrier, but SPORE projects are using emerging technologies to break through. Beyond the ANS project, a group of researchers led by Lesniak used stem cell “shuttles” to deliver immunotherapy directly to the tumor site.

Neural stem cells have an affinity for the brain, often moving to areas of injury. Taking advantage of this travel model, the researchers modified neural stem cells to produce an oncolytic virus, which targets cancer cells and triggers the body’s immune response.

The phase I clinical trial, published in The Lancet Oncology, found this approach to be safe and tolerable for patients, and even showed signs that treatment may improve progression-free survival and overall survival.

“This is the first human clinical trial to test the delivery of neural stem cells of a modified oncolytic adenovirus,” Lesniak said.

Planning for the future

Roger Stupp, MD, Paul C. Bucy professor of neurological surgery, and Priya Kumthekar, MD, ’11 ’12 GME, associate professor in the department of neurology Ken and Ruth Davee, division of neuro-oncology, were the co-authors of the study published in Brain. Atique Ahmed, PhD, associate professor of neurological surgery, was the lead author.

This focus on results – or clinical trials testing therapies – is what unites all members of Brain Tumor SPORE. Kumthekar, who participates in almost all of the clinical trials that have emerged from SPORE, attributes their success to two things: planning and people.

“When we test drugs in the preclinical phase, we plan for the first clinical phase I. When we are in phase I, we plan for phases II and III,” Kumthekar said. “We are always planning the next phase with the goal of getting drugs that work for patients as quickly as possible.”

In addition, the wealth of brilliant minds within the Lurie Cancer Center made the collaboration transparent and stimulating for the participating professors. From her work with Stegh and Mirkin to preclinical work with Atique Ahmed, PhD, associate professor of neurological surgery, Brain Tumor SPORE’s biggest resource has been its staff, Kumthekar said.

A collaborative project between Kumthekar, Ahmed and Stupp found that a drug currently used to prevent organ rejection in transplant patients may also reduce resistance to chemotherapy in glioblastoma. Posted in Brain, the researchers found that this drug blocks a molecular synthesis pathway used by cancer cells treated with radiotherapy; when unable to create molecules essential for DNA synthesis, cancer cells are more likely to succumb to therapy and die.

The round-trip collaboration between Kumthekar and Ahmed – bringing together clinical trial and laboratory expertise – is one of the reasons this drug was selected by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, which is part of the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN). As a participating primary university site, the Lurie Cancer Center provides scientific leadership in the development and conduct of clinical research within the NCTN, and planning for the Phase I trial at Northwestern is already in full swing. A potential Phase III trial could take place at multiple Alliance Network sites in the United States, according to Kumthekar.

“The field is very interested in redirecting drugs right now, and this is helping us to accelerate the availability of drugs for patients,” Kumthekar said.

The end goal of patient care is what unites all SPORE members – from laboratory scientists to clinical trial experts – and as these therapies move through the long process of clinical trial evaluation, some scientists are hoping that better treatments are coming. the corner.

“Over the past ten to fifteen years, our body of knowledge about the molecular characteristics of glioblastoma has grown dramatically,” said James. “As we take the information generated by dozens, if not hundreds of labs, and analyze individual patients’ tumors to determine characteristics that can be targeted with specific therapies, I think we’ll start to see faster progress. in the effective treatment of this cancer. “

Lesniak, James, Stupp, Stegh, Mirkin, Kumthekar and Ahmed are members of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center at Northwestern University and are part of the Lou and Jean Malnati Brain Tumor Institute at Lurie Cancer Center. Lesniak is director of neuro-oncology at the Lurie Cancer Center. Lesniak and James are principal investigators at Lurie Cancer Center’s Brain Tumor SPORE.

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Advanced technique offers new insights into the dynamics of gliomas https://vetclinpathjournal.org/advanced-technique-offers-new-insights-into-the-dynamics-of-gliomas/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/advanced-technique-offers-new-insights-into-the-dynamics-of-gliomas/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 02:53:00 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/advanced-technique-offers-new-insights-into-the-dynamics-of-gliomas/

A team led by researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine, the New York Genome Center, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard profiled in unprecedented detail thousands of individual cells sampled from of brain tumors of patients. The results, as well as the methods developed to obtain these results, represent a significant advance in cancer research and could ultimately lead to better methods of detecting, monitoring and treating cancers.

As the researchers reported on September 30 in Genetics of nature, they used advanced techniques to record gene mutations, gene activity, and programming marks of gene activity on DNA called methylations, in individual tumor cells sampled from patients with gliomas, the type of most common brain cancer. In this way, they mapped distinct behaviors or “states” of tumor cells in gliomas and identified key programming marks that appear to move glioma cells from one state to another. These programming brands, in principle, could be targeted with future drugs.

By combining their single-cell methods with a molecular clock technique, the researchers created “ancestral trees” for the sampled tumor cells, describing their histories of state changes.

“It’s like having a time machine – we can take a sample of a patient’s tumor and deduce a lot of details about how that tumor grew,” said co-lead author Dr Dan Landau. , Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Medical Hematology and Oncology and Fellow of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medicine, and Senior Fellow of the New York Genome Center.

“We were able to make observations here that have fundamental implications for how we should think about treating gliomas,” said co-lead author Dr Mario Suva, associate professor of pathology at Harvard Medical School, pathologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. and Fellow of the Broad Institute at MIT and Harvard.

Tumor cells have traditionally been characterized as a whole, rather than individually, and relatively simply, for example by their cell type of origin and the receptors they carry on their surface. Drs. Landau and Suva, however, helped pioneer the use of “single-cell multi-omics” methods to profile tumor cells individually and in much more detail.

In the new study, they used a three-layered method: recording not only genetic sequence and genetic transcription information, but also methylation marks controlling “epigenetic” transcription on DNA; for the first time on individual tumor cells directly from patients. Scientists sampled more than 100 tumor cells on average from each of the seven patients with HDI-mutant glioma and from seven patients with more treatment-resistant glioma called HDI wild-type glioblastoma.

They found that cells from both cancers tended to be in one of four distinct states, ranging from stem cell-like states to states like those in more mature brain cells. They also identified distinct patterns of DNA methylation that seem to explain the changes between these states; such patterns could in principle be disrupted by future therapies to suppress such state changes and slow tumor development.

While the researchers captured what was essentially a snapshot of cellular states in the sampled tumors, they also devised a molecular clock method, based on the random changes in DNA methylations that occur naturally over time. , to calculate a lineage tree for each cell-; illustrating its history of different states, dating back to the origin of the tumor.

The lineage trees revealed among other things that glioblastoma cells, compared to lower grade glioma cells, had a high degree of “plasticity” allowing them to switch relatively easily between stem-like states and more mature states.

The highly plastic cellular architecture of HDI wild-type glioblastoma may allow it to survive stem cell destruction treatments by regenerating these cells from its pool of more mature cells. “

Dr Federico Gaiti, co-first author, postdoctoral fellow at the Landau laboratory

The results in general offer a wealth of information on the dynamics of gliomas, information that should be useful in developing better methods of detection, staging, monitoring and treatment.

The researchers now plan to use their single-cell multi-omics approach to study how gliomas respond to different treatments. In principle, they said, the approach can be used to study the development of any type of tumor, or even genetic mutations that accumulate with age in healthy tissue.

Source:

Journal reference:

Chaligne, R., et al. (2021) Epigenetic coding, heritability and plasticity of states of glioma transcriptional cells. Genetics of nature. doi.org/10.1038/s41588-021-00927-7.

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Covid Slows Some Cancer Lab Work, But Testing Continues https://vetclinpathjournal.org/covid-slows-some-cancer-lab-work-but-testing-continues/ https://vetclinpathjournal.org/covid-slows-some-cancer-lab-work-but-testing-continues/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 08:18:49 +0000 https://vetclinpathjournal.org/covid-slows-some-cancer-lab-work-but-testing-continues/

The Covid-19 pandemic has slowed the progress of cancer research that has taken place over the past two decades, but some clinical trials have continued despite the limits of the pandemic – according to the Cork-based oncologist, Dr Richard Bambury.

Dr Bambury said Irish Medical Time that in cancer research, while laboratory work suffered due to the demands of social distancing, numerous clinical trials – including those conducted at Cork University Hospital – continued to proceed, which had increased the options for patients.

This meant that the treatments that had just been discovered over the past two years were available to patients with no other options, and it was quite an achievement during that time, despite the challenges.

Dr Bambury said that while cancer survival rates in the 1990s were 40%, they are now 60% and increasing – mainly due to research and new treatments. He said research was the most important tool to improve cancer survival rates and welcomed the announcement of more investment in the field announced today, which is World Cancer Day. cancer research.

The Breakthrough Cancer Research charity has announced an investment of € 250,000 in two new doctoral scholarships to be celebrated today. The two scholarships – one based in Dublin and the other in Cork – will explore new treatment options for brain cancer (glioma) and esophageal cancer.

The association also underlined the urgent need to invest more in funding research in Ireland. “More research means more survivors, so we’re thrilled to announce two new PhD scholarships that will hopefully create new treatment options for people with brain and esophageal cancer, which have a low survival rate. Our goal is to create more survival opportunities to give more hope – only cancer research can get us there, which is in urgent need of more funding, ”said Orla Dolan, CEO of Breakthrough Cancer Research .

Seán Dorgan, 70, an esophageal cancer survivor and native of Dun Laoghaire, said when he started having chest spasms shortly after his 60th birthday he thought it was a form of cold or flu, and didn’t associate it with eating or swallowing – which he finds strange in hindsight. After six weeks he presented to his GP and within two weeks he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer.

“I Google searched for the term and immediately regretted it – the prognosis was horrible. Apparently only one in five would survive for five years. The most immediate question for me was: would I be dead in three months, or six, or twelve months? I decided I didn’t need to learn more about the internet; instead, I would go to the specialists who would do their best, even if the odds didn’t seem good.

“It has been 10 years since my diagnosis and I have regained an excellent quality of life thanks to the cancer research and excellent medical care I received at St. James Hospital. Researchers are seeking to better understand the causes of cancer, the best ways to treat them, and how to improve the quality of life for people in treatment, remission and recovery. I benefited from this knowledge. I was healed. I hope many more will be too.

Both scholarships were awarded to Patricia Flynn at University College Cork and Maitiú Ó Murchú at Trinity College Dublin.

Patricia received the Musgrave Doctoral Fellowship, in association with Breakthrough Cancer Research, 2021. Her research will focus on finding a personalized treatment for glioblastoma, the most commonly diagnosed brain tumor, which has only one rate. 5% survival rate after five years. She will focus on the relationship between glioblastoma and retinoic acid, which can promote or stop cancer growth. Its goal is to identify pathways that suppress the growth of glioblastoma and prevent its recurrence. Patricia says: “There are too many question marks around the treatment of glioblastoma. I want to eliminate some of the question marks and make full stops.

Maitiú Ó Murchú received the 2021 Breakthrough Cancer Research Doctoral Fellowship for new research on esophageal cancer, cancer of the food pipe. Only 20% of the 450 people diagnosed with the disease each year in Ireland are alive after 5 years. His research will examine why radiation has no effect on reducing tumor size before surgery for 70% of patients. Maitiú will examine whether this is due to the lack of oxygen in the tumor and whether the increased oxygen levels by injecting Oxygel, an oxygen-carrying gel into the tumor, can cause the tumor to shrink. This could ultimately make esophageal treatment more effective.

Breakthrough Cancer Research is Ireland’s leading cancer research charity. They are working with researchers and scientists on exciting developments in cell therapy, immunotherapy, surgical alternatives, and personalized medicine that will improve survival rates and minimize side effects of current treatments. He has established partnerships with experts from a number of global centers of research excellence including cancer research at UCC, Conway Institute UCD, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, Weill Cornell Medical College (New York), Royal Marsden (UK), Wilmot Cancer Institute (Rochester, NY), University of Copenhagen and the Center for Surgical Science (DK). The aim is to substantially increase this collaboration if funding and resources were available. However, Breakthrough currently relies entirely on donations from the public.

Today, on World Cancer Research Day, Breakthrough calls on everyone to play their part in a cancer-free future. Help us buy back futures on cancerresearch.ie or call 021 422 6655.

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