Artificial Wagyu beef: Japanese scientists work on lab-grown meat


If you’ve ever been to Japan and tried to indulge yourself with the famous Wagyu Beef at a top restaurant, you might know that this special beef can cost a bit on the expensive side, even over $ 200 a pound (0 , 45 kilogram). Don’t worry, that may soon change as scientists work on a replica developed in the lab.

Japanese scientists say they were able to recreate the Wagyu, renowned for its marbled fat, in a lab to produce something that could possibly look and taste like real steak.

Wagyu beef comes from a breed of black cattle, primarily cultivated in the Kobe region of western Japan.

Osaka University professor Michiya Matsusaki presents Wagyu beef grown in a laboratory at Suita University in Osaka prefecture, Japan on October 5, 2021. (Photo Reuters)

Osaka University researchers led by Michiya Matsusaki used 3D bio-printers and bovine stem cells to replicate Wagyu’s distinctive marbling in a solid steak-like piece, rather than a minced shape that characterized other attempts at cultured meat.

It currently takes about three to four weeks to generate a cubic centimeter of cultured meat, so it’s not yet ready for the grocer’s aisle. But as techniques and efficiency improve, the method could produce something that mimics reality, Matsusaki said.

“If we are able to quickly produce a lot of meat from a few cells, there is a chance that we can better respond to food and protein shortage issues in the future,” Matsusaki told Reuters.


Osaka University professor Michiya Matsusaki holds a petri dish with Wagyu beef grown in a laboratory at Suita University in Osaka prefecture, Japan on October 5, 2021 (Reuters photo) )
Osaka University professor Michiya Matsusaki holds a petri dish with Wagyu beef grown in a laboratory at Suita University in Osaka prefecture, Japan on October 5, 2021 (Reuters photo) )

Environmental and ethical concerns around the meat industry have sparked interest in plant-based alternatives and the potential of laboratory-grown products. This has spurred strong growth from developers of genuine alternatives to meat, including plant-based burger maker Impossible Foods Inc, which is gearing up for a public listing that could exceed $ 10 billion, according to sources.

Matsusaki said the bioprinting and cultivation techniques developed in his lab could also have applications in human medicine, such as growing replacements for damaged muscles.

It now takes around 10,000 yen ($ 89.40) to produce a single gram of lab-grown Wagyu, but with more automation the price could drop such that it would be marketable to the general public here. five years, Matsusaki said.

About Hector Hedgepeth

Check Also

CORRECT and REPLACE ASC Therapeutics, UMass Chan Medical School, and the Clinic for Special Children Announce Podium Presentation on Safety and Efficacy of Murine and Bovine Models for Novel Gene Therapy in Maple Syrup Urinary Disease

MILPITAS, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Please replace the version dated May 16, 2022 with the following corrected version …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.